Upcoming IABSE Webinars
Do you wish to organise any webinar, please contact: bose@iabse.org
For sponsorship information, please contact: cheryl.cornelio@iabse.org

 

Upcoming Webinars:

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Webinar: The V&A Swingbridge: a unique product responding to multiple needs

When: August 19, 2022 14-15.00 hrs CET
Register in advance for this webinar: Click Here

Fees: None (free for all).

This Webinar is being organised by the South African National Group and TG 1.7.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

Speaker

 

Ms. Maja Wilson, a Section Manager with SMEC South Africa in Cape Town, is a Chartered Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, London and registered as a Professional Engineer with the Engineering Council of South Africa. She has specialized in bridge and building design with fourteen years of experience. Maja holds a Bachelor of Engineering (Civil) from the University of Cape Town, graduating with first class honours.  Maja started her career with COWI in London, before returning home to Cape Town and joining SMEC. She has been involved in the design of many road, rail and pedestrian bridge types including cable stay, suspension, stress ribbon, steel and concrete box girder, and prestressed concrete. She has international experience, having designed bridges in England, Australia, South Africa, The Philippines, Namibia, and Saudi Arabia.  

 

Moderators:

 

Prof. Dr. Pierre van der Spuy, who is Adjunct Professor at Stellenbosch University and Associate at Zutari, South Africa.

 

Mr. Rasmus Rempling, Chair, TG 1.7

 

Summary: 


The V&A Swingbridge: a unique product responding to multiple needs The moving bridges within the V&A Waterfront, Cape Town, South Africa, are a recognised part of its identity and a memorable part of any visitor’s experience. One of its moving footbridges, a cable stayed swing bridge was recently replaced with a new wider swing bridge. The new 4 m wide bridge doubles the previous crossing’s capacity and improves access across the cut to the expanding Clock Tower Precinct.  Moving bridges are an integration of many functional design requirements and, in the V&A, important experiences and place-makers for visitors. This paper tells the story of how, from that integration of needs, opportunities created the form of the new bridge and dictated how it was built. The new footbridge is cable-stayed with a single plane of four locked coil cables connecting to a central, upstand spine beam. The spine beam is 500 mm wide and has a total depth of 800 mm, but only 470 mm protrudes above the top of the deck. The reclining pylon is in the continuity of the main central beam and its stiffness transfers the cable loads into the piled substructure. The superstructure rotates on a 3550 mm diameter, internally geared, three-row roller slew bearing that is driven by four hydraulic motors with a maximum output torque of 42 kNm each. The new footbridge performs to the same high standards of its predecessor, opening and closing up to sixty times a day, carrying up to 2.4 million people per year. The need to maintain access across the cut meant it was installed and commissioned within one month of the removal of the previous bridge. 

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Webinar: New Ashton Arch, Western Cape, South Africa: Design and Construction Aspects​  

This Webinar is being organised by the South African National Group.

When: Sept.2, 14-15.30 hrs.

Speaker: Abe Newmark and Heinrich van Wijk

Register in advance for this webinar: Click Here                 

Fees: None (free for all)                               

Mode: 45-minute presentation for the general public (and engineers) followed by Q&A.

 

Speakers:

Abe Newmark

Since graduating as a Civil Engineer 44 years ago at University of Pretoria, South Africa, Abé Newmark has specialised in Project Management, Feasibility Studies, Conceptual Planning, Detail Design, Tender Documentation and Construction Management of projects encompassing the full spectrum of Civil Infrastructure, with specific emphasis on major Highway and Bridge projects in South Africa, several African countries, and the Middle East. His speciality is bridge structural design and leading of design teams for bridge construction projects.

 

Heinrich van Wijk

Heinrich has gained experience in the civil infrastructure construction industry after completion of his undergraduate studies. Major projects which he has been involved with includes a concrete gravity dam, a concrete tied-arch bridge and currently a 580 m span composite cable stay bridge. As a bridge engineer his core role lays within structural analysis and design, with a particular interest in erection engineering. For the Ashton Arch Bridge and the Msikaba River Bridge, he has been intimately involved with the finite element modelling, cable optimisation and erection monitoring.

 

Moderator:

 

Dr. Pierre van der Spuy (Chair, SA National Group)

Adjunct Professor at Stellenbosch University and Associate at Zutari. He is currently planning two webinars to start discussing various topics and increase engagement within the National Group.

 

 

 

Summary:

The New Ashton Arch Bridge was completed in the town of Ashton, South Africa, crossing the Cogmanskloof river. The bridge replaces an existing solid spandrel, a multi-arch bridge which had reached the end of its functional service life. The new tied-arch bridge comprises a cable-supported concrete deck which spans 110 metres between bearings and arching ribs which rise 22 metres above the asphalt road surface. The superstructure, which was completed mid 2020 adjacent to the existing road-alignment was then transversely jacked to its final position after completion of the substructure. This presentation highlights important design and construction aspects that are of interest to the civil engineering profession.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Webinar: Without even touching it: the story of the Leaning Tower of Pisa

When: Oct. 7, 2022 14-15.00 hrs CET
Register in advance for this webinar: Click Here

Fees: None (free for all).

This Webinar is being organised by the Italian group of IABSE and the Task Group 5.1 on Forensics Structural Engineering.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 

The history of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a monument with an age of 850 years, a settlement of 3 m and an out of plumb of 5 m, is briefly recalled. The intervention of underexcavation carried out in the 1990’s is described; it succeeded in arresting the progress of the inclination of the monument, though fully respecting its integrity. Several lessons have been learned by this experience. First, the analysis of the history of the Tower, and particularly its monitoring in the last decades, greatly contributed to a thorough understanding of the mechanism of instability and to the conception of a stabilising intervention. Secondly, an important role has been played by a truly interdisciplinary approach. This is probably a banal observation since the importance of a shared culture among the different actors of conservation and restoration appears by now widely recognized. In fact, many preach interdisciplinarity but few practice it, probably because it is a not easy matter. Finally, it is shown that a modicum of good luck won’t do any harm!

 

Speaker: 

Carlo Viggiani is Emeritus Professor at the University of Napoli Federico II where he had been teaching Foundation Engineering from 1975 to 2009. He is Author or Co-Author of 5 books and 230 technical papers; has been Editor of the Italian Geotechnical Journal; component of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics. He has been State of the Art Reporter at the ICSMFE in New Delhi, 1994 (Mitigation of Natural Hazards: Landslides and Subsidence) and at the ICSMGE in Osaka, 2005 (Pile foundations). He has been Chairman of TC19 (later TC301) (Preservation of Monuments and Historic Sites) of the ISSMGE, and participated to the conservation of a number of monuments affected by geotechnical problem, including the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Involved in the design and construction of earth dams, civil and industrial buildings, bridges, tunnels and underground constructions, stabilisation of landslides. Consultant for Italian Railways and Underground Transportation Systems in Rome, Napoli, Torino, Bologna, Firenze. Involved in the design of the suspension bridge over the Messina Straits.

 

Introduction:

Prof. Maria Giuseppina Limongelli, member of the IABSE Italian Group and vice Chair of the IABSE e-learning board; John Duntemann, Chair of IABSE Task Group 5.1 on Forensic Structural Engineering.

 

Moderators:

Dr. Fabrizio Palmisano, IABSE Task Group 5.1, Member of the Italian NG, Vice-Chair, IABSE Bulletin Board; Prof. Claudia Vitone, Associate Professor of geotechnical engineering at the Technical University of Bari

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Webinar: Omaru River Bridge Repair, Namibia, South Africa 

This Webinar is being organised by the South African National Group.

When: October 28, 14-15.30 hrs.

Speaker: Johan Kotze, South Africa

Register in advance for this webinar: Click Here                 

Fees: None (free for all)                               

Mode: 45-minute presentation for the general public (and engineers) followed by Q&A.

 

Summary of the Webinar: 

 

The upgrading and rehabilitating of the Omaruru River Bridge stemmed from the project to upgrade the salt road between Swakopmund and Henties Bay (MR44) to a bituminous paved road. First constructed in 1980, after a mere 12 years, it required comprehensive concrete repairs due to severe concrete damage to the structure. A further 23 years later, in 2015, the bridge was found to have deteriorated again to an extent that greatly compromised its structural integrity. The deterioration of the Omaruru River Bridge was predominantly the result of the harsh local conditions. Located approximately 2 km from the Atlantic Ocean, its poor condition can be attributed to the extremely harsh environmental conditions impacting the bridge. The climate in this area varies from very warm and dry (when the wind blows from the inland of Namibia) to wet, misty and very cold, virtually marine conditions (when the wind blows from the ocean). This results in temperatures ranging from 0°C to 45°C. In addition to these environmental conditions, the approach road was a salt road, which had been sprayed regularly with salt water. The combination of the harsh environment and salt ingress into the structure created ideal circumstances for the inevitable chloride corrosion of the steel reinforcement and weakening of the concrete.

Various options were evaluated for rehabilitating and upgrading the Omaruru River Bridge. The most sustainable and cost-effective repair solution comprised demolishing and rebuilding elements of the bridge (the deck and pier seating beams), as well as changing the bridge’s structural configuration from simply supported to continuous. The durability of the original bridge was mainly compromised in those locations where water flowed on the concrete due to the specific detailing at the time. The detailing issues identified included leaking joints, drainage pipes flowing on the deck and piers as well as porous surfacing.  The durability of the bridge could therefore be increased by ensuring that water does not flow on the concrete.  This was achieved by reducing the number of joints and sealing joints, installing a gutter system, waterproofing the deck below the surfacing and incorporating galvanized reinforcement as well as providing sacrificial anodes for the reinforcement of specific critical structural elements.

Johan Kotzé is currently a Technical Director and Civil Structure Lead for Zutari (previously Aurecon in Africa and the Middle East).  He worked since 1996 in the bridge department and started working in 1994 after completing his Master’s Degree in Structural Engineering at the University of Pretoria. Some of the projects he worked on included the Gautrain Rapid Rail Link in South Africa consisting of a match pre-cast segmental constructed viaduct, an incrementally launched bridge over the Usuthu River bridge in Eswatini (previously Swaziland).  A current project which Johan is involved in is the Polihali Major Bridges project at the new Polihali dam in Lesotho.   

 

Moderator:

 

Dr. Pierre van der Spuy (Chair, SA National Group)

Adjunct Professor at Stellenbosch University and Associate at Zutari. He is currently planning two webinars to start discussing various topics and increase engagement within the National Group.